• Bruni

Breakfast Sourdough Bread - young starter


This recipe is a continuation of our Sourdough journey. With other bakers we have created young starter (Sourdough Starter from scratch - step by step guide). To mimic challenges created by using baby starter, we have used our 9-day-old starter for this sourdough recipe. This recipe is a spin-off of our favourite Breakfast Sourdough Bread (you can find the recipe here). The challenges with freshly created baby starter are different. Starter will work different. This is a journey and as you will see when comparing outcomes (mature vs. young starter) it takes some time to develop cultures which will do all the heavy lifting for you. In the baking process here, we will also ‘autolyse’ with salt, use same ingredients. However, with young starter you will use more levain, bulk and final proof will be shorter. We will include directions for longer final cold proof (this would be a preferred option as results are better!) and quick final proof (making it a same-day bread).


In this way, you will get a sound introduction to different stages of bread baking process, you will use dough which is easy to work with and knead, is mild in flavour and the process is not too long. Mature starter allows for firmer dough - shaping is a breeze (the starter is doing all the heavy lifting). With younger starter - the dough is slightly more sticky and ‘fresh’. Once your starter matures - transfer to the first option (with 50g starter and longer overall fermentation). If you feed your starter as outlined in our guide you can check mature starter recipe already in wk 3-4, with visible improvement around wk 4-6 (but all will depend on your feeding schedule and vigour of your baby starter).


Our simple breakfast bread has 90% white bread flour and 10% wholemeal spelt (or rye). Small addition of wholemeal spelt adds slightly sweet and nutty flavour to this bread. Hydration of 70% (including water used for mixing) produces fairly airy crumb. The crumb benefits from longer maturation in the fridge - hence 1st option with longer cold retard would be preferable.


Please refer to initial guide posted here for quick introduction into bread baking process. These notes should help you to understand consecutive steps in the process.


On our Instagram (@brunibakery) you can watch a video with full baking process - there is a 'how-to' tutorial showing autolyse, how to knead and shape this dough. In the same place, you may also opt to check the list of fantastic sourdough resources: books, IG accounts, youtube channels, bakeries.




Breakfast Sourdough Bread - 12hr cold proof (preferred option) - young starter recipe

Ingredients:


- 405g white bread flour (12g protein or more)

- 45g wholemeal spelt or rye flour

- 10g coarse sea salt

- 280g water (21C) + 10g during final mixing

- 150g levain

Method and timings:

1. Prepare levain (Day 1: 9am): mix 15g of starter with 120g water (26C), then add 100g white bread flour and 20g wholemeal rye flour. Mix gently until no flour pockets remain. Cover and let rest at room temperature (18-21C). We are using here 1:8:8 proportions but adjust to fit your starter. If you want to start baking later - adjust ratio accordingly. Use levain at its peak or shortly after it started descending.


Levain, straight after mixing

2. 'Autolyse' with salt (Day 1: 9.15am-5pm, 7-8hrs total): in your main mixing bowl mix flours with coarse salt. Add water (21C) and mix until shaggy dough forms. Don’t over-mix. Mix only until no flour pockets remain. The dough should be sticky. Transfer the dough onto work surface, clean the bowl and transfer the dough back into the bowl. Cover your bowl or place in plastic bag (close using elastic band to prevent from drying out). Leave to rest at cool room temperature (14-18C; if it’s warmer - place the dough in the fridge for 3 hours and then leave on the counter for the remaining part of autolyse).


Autolyse with salt - flour, water, salt

Autolyse with salt - dough straight after mixing - shaggy and sitcky


3. Mix the dough (Day 1: 5pm): spread 150g levain on top of the dough (use the rest to replenish your starter). Make few dimples in the dough to gently incorporate the starter and relax the dough. Gently stretch and fold the dough (grabbing from the bottom and pulling up), work your way all around the bowl (5 or 6 S&Fs). Now your dough is ready for mixing - wet your hand and use your favourite mixing technique. We are using a mix of Rubaud method and slap&fold. Mix for 4 minutes. The gluten development is already on the go due to long ‘autolyse’ with salt so you don’t want to over-work the dough. Wet your hand every so often to relax the dough. Incorporate additional water (that’s your +10g in the recipe) during mixing (as needed). After brief initial mixing, cover the dough and let rest for 15 minutes, then knead for another 4-5 minutes. When done, cover the dough and transfer for bulk proof (24-25C is ideal for this dough).


Levain, just before mixing into the dough

Dough after 'autolyse' with salt

Dough after incorporation of starter and final mixing

4. Bulk (Day 1: 5.30pm - 9/9.30pm at 24-25C, 3hr30min-4 hrs total): 45 minutes after mixing do the first set of stretch and fold. Pull the dough up (grabbing from the bottom up) - stretch, and then fold it on top of itself (don’t push too hard, as much as the dough allows you to, without tearing gluten). Then cover and let rest. In the first 2hrs 30min do 3 to 4 S&Fs, every 30-45minutes. I usually do a simple S&F (1) and a set of coil folds (2 or 3). Leave the dough untouched for the last 1hr 30min of bulk fermentation. You will aim for 60-80% increase vs. initial volume.


Dough 5min after the first set of S&F

Dough at the end of bulk proof

5. Shape (Day 1: 9:30 pm, 21-24C): when ready, dust your work surface with flour (less is more), gently release the dough (watch not to degas, let it float slowly and freely, without tearing gluten). Pre-shape the dough and leave on the bench for 20min, covered. Then shape the dough (the way you shape it will depend on proofing basket you are using - check out our Instagram for simple way to shape your dough). Place in proofing basket, cover. Let it rest on the counter for 30 minutes. Then transfer to the fridge.


The dough just before shaping


6. Final proof (Day 1-2, 9.30pm -10am, 12hrs 30min total): After 30min on the bench transfer your dough to the fridge (3-4C). Proof for 12 hours. Make sure to check your fridge for actual working temperature - anything above 4C would mean your dough is continuing to proof so you are at risk of over-proofing (set it to actual 3 or 4C).



Dough after the final proof

7. Bake (Day 2, 10am) : 1 hour before baking preheat your oven with Dutch Oven in (or other dish, pizza stone etc) to 245C (set fan forced oven to 245C too!). When ready, take the dough out of the fridge (don't proof on the bench anymore), place a piece of parchment paper on top, rotate around so that the parchment paper is at the boom, take off the proofing basket, score the bread and place immediately into hot Dutch Oven. Apply some water mist on top of the dough, place few ice-cubes between the bottom of the pot and parchment paper (watch, as the steam will go right up - wear gloves). Immediately place the lid on and bake for 25minutes at 245C/230C fan (with the lid on) and 15-20 minutes at 230C/215C fan (with the lid off). When baked, transfer your bread to the cooling rack and let it cool for 2-4 hours for the crumb to set.





2nd option


Method and timing - same-day bread, young starter


This approach is optional. It does produce quicker, same-day bread. The crumb is more closed-knit.

  1. Prepare levain (Day 1, 10pm): mix 15g of starter with 120g water (26C), then add 100g white bread flour and 20g wholemeal rye flour. Mix gently until no flour pockets remain. Cover and let rest overnight at room temperature (18-21C). We are using here 1:8:8 proportions but adjust to fit your starter. If you want to start baking later on - adjust ratio accordingly. Use levain at its peak or shortly after it started descending.

  2. Autolyse with salt (Day 1, 10.15pm-8am, 10 hrs total): in your main mixing bowl mix flours with coarse salt. Add water (21C) and mix until shaggy dough forms. Don’t over-mix. Mix only until no flour pockets remain. The dough should be sticky. Transfer the dough onto work surface, clean the bowl and transfer the dough back into the bowl. Cover your bowl or place in plastic bag (close using elastic band to prevent from drying out). Leave at cool room temperature (14-18C).

  3. Mix the dough (Day 2, 8am): spread 150g levain on top of the dough (use the rest to replenish your starter). Make few dimples in the dough to gently incorporate the starter and relax the dough. Gently stretch and fold the dough (grabbing from the bottom and pulling up), work your way all around the bowl (5 or 6 S&Fs). Now your dough is ready for mixing - wet your hand and use your favourite mixing technique. We are using a mix of Rubaud method and slap&fold. Mix for 4 minutes. The gluten development is already on the go due to long ‘autolyse’ with salt so you don’t want to over-work the dough. Wet your hand every so often to relax the dough. Incorporate additional water (on your hand - that’s your +10g water in the recipe) during mixing (as needed). After brief initial mixing, cover the dough and let rest for 15 minutes, then knead for another 4-5 minutes. When done, cover the dough and transfer for bulk proof (24-25C is ideal for this dough).

  4. Bulk (Day 2, 8.30pm - 12.30pm at 24-25C, 3hrs 30min - 4 hrs total): 45 minutes after mixing do the first set of stretch and fold. Pull the dough up (grabbing from the bottom up) - stretch, and then fold it on top of itself (don’t push too hard, as much as the dough allows you to, without tearing). Then cover and let rest. In the first 2 hrs 30min do 3 S&Fs, every 45minutes. I usually do a simple S&F (1) and a set of coil folds (2). Leave the dough untouched for the last 1 hr 30min of bulk fermentation. You will aim for 60-80% increase vs. initial volume.

  5. Shape (Day 2, 12:30 pm, 21-24C): when ready, dust your work surface with flour (less is more), gently release the dough (watch not to degas, let it float slowly and freely, without tearing gluten). Pre-shape the dough and leave on the bench for 20min, covered. Then, shape the dough (the way you shape it will depend on proofing basket you are using - check out our Instagram for simple way to shape your dough). Place in proofing basket, cover.

  6. Final proof (Day 2, 1pm-5.30pm, 4hrs 30min total): leave the dough at room temperature (21C) for 1hr 30min, then transfer to the fridge for 3hrs (at 3C).

  7. Bake (Day 2, 5.30pm): 1 hour before baking preheat your oven with Dutch Oven in it (or other dish, stone etc) to 245C (preheat fan forced ovens to 245C too!). When ready, take the dough out of the fridge (don't proof on the bench anymore), place a piece of parchment paper on top, rotate around so that the parchment paper is at the boom, take off the proofing basket, score the bread and place immediately into hot Dutch Oven. Apply some water mist on top of the dough, place few ice-cubes between the bottom of the pot and parchment paper (watch, as the steam will go right up - wear gloves). Immediately place the lid on and bake for 25minutes at 245C/230C fan (with the lid on) and 15-20 minutes at 230C/215C fan (with the lid off). When baked, transfer your bread to the cooling rack and let it cool for 2-4 hours for the crumb to set.


2nd option - same-day bread
2nd option - same-day bread

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